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's happened over the last couple of weeks. but going over the fiscal cliff is serious business. and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious, as well. >> all right. so once again, here are the cliff notes right here. republicans on the hill are demanding trillions of dollars worth of debt reduction. that's pretty much fine with democrats who say the wealthy should foot the bill in the form of higher tax rates. and therein lies the catch because the republicans want the savings of federal spending cuts. that dispute blocking efforts to keep rates from rising on everyone. as scheduled on january 1st. this is a so-called fiscal cliff. january 1st. our news makers representative jim clyburn of south carolina, number three democrat in the house of representatives and number one i'm sure to a lot of people. hello. how are you? >> hey, don. thank you so much for having me. >> thanks for coming on. is speaker boehner right, though? as the clock is ticking, ticking toward january 1st, the talks haven't progressed in two weeks. is he right? >> well, i
into next year. >> this is not -- the fiscal cliff is not about long-term solutions to anything. the fiscal cliff is not about solutions, period, not real solutions. what we have here is political gamesmanship. >> greta: tonight republicans have a sizzling question for president obama, what is his plan? senator john cornyn putting that message into a video. ♪ >> greta: senator ron johnson sits on the budget committee. he joins us. how you doing, sir? >> very well. >> greta: before i ask you what you understand to be the president's plan, the republicans put the revenues on the table. where do you get those revenues? >> first of all, a number of republicans said they're willing to consider that if they see the other half of the president's promised balanced approach. you know, where is he going to start restrained growth in government? we're open to working with anybody who's willing to acknowledge the problem. >> greta: who's going to blink first? >> first of all, let me tell you where you should get revenue. >> greta: okay. >> by growing the economy. just a couple numbers. already in thi
-called fiscal cliff is a solvable problem. critical as the holidays approach and businesses make investment and hiring decisions for next year. while polls show many americans are pessimistic, there's optimism in this home. >> i got a sense that he's confident that what's best for the american people will happen. >> yeah. >> reporter: you agree? >> yes. >> i do too. >> reporter: but for now, the gop's resisting any tax increases even on those upper income americans. house republicans of course have made the counteroffer with $800 billion in new revenue and an overhaul of the tax code. wolf, they feel as if they have moved the ball, but they don't believe that the president is interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> these negotiations, dan, they usually go until the bitter, bitter end. a lot of folks are assuming that before that end there will be a deal. give us a flavor of the mood at the white house. >> reporter: well, i think they're preparing for this fiscal cliff scenario to play out, wolf. but as you point out when we look back over the last three years, we've had these kinds of n
to avoid the fiscal cliff happening? >> i have no doubt that people are working hard to get a deal. we have the president re-elected and have a new congress, think it's right they get down to the business of sorting this out. i think america's got to think that what it needs to do is get growth in its economy, as well. and it needs to get growth by trade and exporting. and i think what we're missing at the moment is a global agreement whereby the big powers try to work on the economy. you have to have fiscal problems and you also have to have growth. that's the key for the future. there's a global deal waiting to be done, with china, europe, india also involved in this, and of course, america itself, where we could build the confidence that's necessary to get high levels of growth around the world. >> finally, gordon brown, i couldn't let you go without asking your view of the single biggest news story to hit the planet in the last week. it is, of course, the royal baby. >> it's incredibly important that we give them the privacy because her health is a massive issue. but you can see that br
is terrible for the market. well, the easiest way to end the uncertainty about the fiscal cliff and tax rates and their potential impact of the vast majority of americans as they go into this vital holiday shopping season that's pretty central to our economy is for us to pass that and say okay, that part of this is over. the $2,000 on average tax hike that most working families are facing, if we go over the cliff done, taken care of. now, let's work through the balance of increased revenue on the high income earners and spending cuts that we need to get done to achieve a roughly $4 trillion savings. >> bill: and closing loopholes and other issues. >> that's a difficult process. there's lots of detail to it. in my view, there's two bad outcomes here that are quite possible. first is we do nothing. which is -- something we seem to have shown some real capability of. but if we go over the if is cal cliff, which is really more of a slope than a cliff. it is not like y2k where january 1, everybody has a dramatic cuts in services an
to avert that fiscal cliff that we hear so much about. yesterday, after weeks of delay, and as the days dwindle and taxes are set to go up for millions of families and businesses, republicans in the house finally showed up at the negotiating table. and now we know why they've been holding their cards so close it their vest. their proposal would raise taxes on millions of middle-class families. their plan to raise $800 billion in revenue by eliminating popular tax deductions and credits would reach deep into pockets of middle-class families. republicans are so intent on protecting low tax rates for millionaires and billionaires, they're willing to sacrifice middle-class families' economic security to do so. at the first of the year, middle-class families, will get an average of $200 i,200 in additional taxes they'll have to pay. their proposal was short on specifics but we do know from independent analysis that it is impossible to raise enough revenue and make a dent in our deficit without using one of two things -- raising tax rates on the top 2% or raising taxes on the middle class. an
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)